Urbanity Sanity

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Urban agriculture is a means to create local agronomic systems, address food insecurity and access in low-income communities, while responding to global climate and food changes.

Local Food and Local Farms

Participating in one’s community’s prosperity is also participating in one’s own prosperity....

May 31

Food, Inc. looks fantastic and I’m looking forward to checking it out!

This film is coming out June 12th in SF, LA and NYC. It really needs to be debuting in DC, a town of politics and influences that are at the crux of our food issues. It’s a quandary that this film isn’t opening in the cities and towns that need it most, like DC and the largest farming states that produce the most industrialized agriculture in America, like CA’s inland countries, Illinois, who grows the most soy, and Iowa, who grows the most corn!  Getting this information out to those who need it the most would really be revolutionary. Preaching to the choir is fuel for the mission, but let’s be real rebels and roar across the U.S. upon the deaf ears and blinded visions!


May 28

May 11
The Old Town Alexandria farmers market gets started in the Spring and continues on into the Summer and peaks in the Fall, dwindling in the winter to nothing but random antiques and shipped in produce—terribly disappointing for a region with so much potential and growth. However, this is not about winter’s destitute. No, this is about the abundance that comes from not having anything but shipped in produce and random antiques for months to having lovely corn and onions from Maryland and Northern Virginia within a 10 minute walk from my house. Like Spring’s coming, I do not take the presence of edible life for granted, regardless of their magnitude or depth of their spread. Where this market lacks in size and outreach to less fortunate neighbors, it makes up for in climax. It presents itself with a sudden bang of life, an overnight miracle.
The fruits and veggies and flowers are clambered around by diligent dog walkers and upper class delicatessen shoppers. There’s not a whole lot of diversity to say the least (in produce of connoisseurship), but boy is there expectation, and who doesn’t like a good build up, a brilliantly planned ascendancy only to pinnacle at mediocrity. Though I don’t gripe when I am there chatting up my Maryland farmer over his radishes with fresh coffee in tow, in fact I may even blend completely into the mesh of regulars, but it certainly gets me thinking in hindsight. 

The Old Town Alexandria farmers market gets started in the Spring and continues on into the Summer and peaks in the Fall, dwindling in the winter to nothing but random antiques and shipped in produce—terribly disappointing for a region with so much potential and growth. However, this is not about winter’s destitute. No, this is about the abundance that comes from not having anything but shipped in produce and random antiques for months to having lovely corn and onions from Maryland and Northern Virginia within a 10 minute walk from my house. Like Spring’s coming, I do not take the presence of edible life for granted, regardless of their magnitude or depth of their spread. Where this market lacks in size and outreach to less fortunate neighbors, it makes up for in climax. It presents itself with a sudden bang of life, an overnight miracle.

The fruits and veggies and flowers are clambered around by diligent dog walkers and upper class delicatessen shoppers. There’s not a whole lot of diversity to say the least (in produce of connoisseurship), but boy is there expectation, and who doesn’t like a good build up, a brilliantly planned ascendancy only to pinnacle at mediocrity. Though I don’t gripe when I am there chatting up my Maryland farmer over his radishes with fresh coffee in tow, in fact I may even blend completely into the mesh of regulars, but it certainly gets me thinking in hindsight. 


Apr 23

Apr 15
“The truth about gardening
A veggie plot at the White House will no doubt lead more Americans to embrace this green fad. But prospective gardeners, beware: This hobby isn’t cheap — or easy.
Alcestis “Cooky” Oberg
898 words
15 April 2009
USA Today
FIRST
A.10
English
© 2009 USA Today. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All Rights Reserved.
When Michelle Obama recently decided to plant a kitchen garden at the White House, I was pleased. Fresh vegetables from the garden are great. Better yet, the recession has made gardening popular again, as vegetable seed sales are up nearly 20% over last year.
But like any fad, this craze is full of hype and short on facts. Recent articles tout how some people have saved “thousands” of dollars with kitchen gardens, perhaps paving the way to freedom from the grocery store. Burpee Seeds enthused that $50 spent on gardening supplies can multiply into $1,250 worth of produce annually.
Don’t bet on it.
While “victory gardens” did provide 40% of the nation’s produce during World War II, American agriculture has since become more efficient, cost-effective and productive. Bargains abound at grocery stores. Besides that, vegetables and fruit are only one small portion of the family food budget, which usually includes dairy, grain, meat and other products we can’t provide for ourselves.
Don’t get me wrong. I’ve been a gardener for more than 40 years, and my yard is one big edible landscape full of fruit trees and vegetable beds. There are many good reasons to grow your own produce, but saving money shouldn’t be the main one. People who are thinking about starting a kitchen garden need to know a few real- life facts:
*Gardening is not cheap. That first garden might require the purchase of tools (shovels, hoes, cultivators, tomato cages, fences, water hoses), maybe some machines for big plots (tillers, weed- eaters and their fuel), soil amendments (fertilizers, mulches, composts, manures, top soils), seeds or transplants, and water. Organic gardeners like to add composting bins to that sizeable bill, in order to recycle cut grass, leaves and other refuse.
*Gardening is not easy. You don’t just put a seed in the ground and walk away until the harvest. You have to concern yourself with weeding, watering, soil enrichment, drainage, mulch, keeping kids and soccer balls out of the garden — to say nothing of varmints such as squirrels, birds, raccoons and deer that show up uninvited at the backyard deli.
*Purely organic gardens will probably fail in many places. I live in Texas. The bugs are going to win here. So if vicious, poisonous fire ants try to set up a colony in my garden, I have to kill them. Co-existence is not an option. Ditto for other voracious insects intent upon destroying my crops. I use the mildest chemical possible (organic products are chemicals, too) only when and where it’s needed, and I always follow the directions.
*Some locovores — people who insist on eating only locally grown food — are misleading new gardeners into thinking that a kitchen garden can provide everything. I like Bing cherries, Honeycrisp apples, Golden pineapples and apricots — none of which will grow on the Gulf Coast of Texas. Some vegetables and herbs don’t want to live here either. The best place to go to avoid gardeners’ remorse is the local county agricultural extension service, which provides free fact sheets telling you what will or won’t grow in your area.
*There are impractical fashions in gardening, as in clothing. For instance, heirloom tomatoes are fashionable now. However, as my veggie-mentor, garden author Tom LeRoy, told me darkly: “There’s a reason some old varieties aren’t grown anymore.” That very year, my Brandywine heirlooms produced exactly one tomato and died of a disease, while the modern Better Boy right next to it produced 40 pounds of delicious tomatoes. Today, I have a sensible mixture of old and modern vegetable varieties, and I’m always eager to try something new — a white cherry tomato or a purple carrot. I praise American agriculture and science for creating modern vegetables and fruit that are wonderfully resistant to diseases, grow easily, taste great and are far more productive than some of the oldie-goldies.
The benefits of gardening go well beyond the bounty. My kids did well in science partly because they learned botany firsthand, in the garden. There is a special peace and empowerment one gets by growing one’s own food, working closely with the plants and the seasons.
But I’d be dead if I had to live on what I grew. Like many gardeners, the Obamas might find their garden produce to be more of a delightful seasonal addition to the table, rather than a reliable and life-sustaining one.
Many of my crops failed, or had good years and bad ones, depending on the weather. I have real respect for professional farmers who endure all that and keep producing. Last year when my spinach crop didn’t produce, I was invited to harvest some at a church garden nearby, run by a couple of retired farmers. Their acre of tough Texas land was as beautiful as a royal garden, and the row of spinach was so perfect it was humbling.
“These guys know how to grow food,” I confessed.
Alcestis “Cooky” Oberg is a veteran gardener, author of several gardening books, and a member of USA TODAY’s board of contributors.”
Food and Nutrition Service News Clips
Richard Dengrove CGA, HQ, Editor

Apr 9

Songs for Teaching: Dirt Made My Lunch


Mar 20

Mar 18

Urban Gardening Talk Series 2009 


Presented by the Historical Society of Washington (HSW), DC Urban Gardeners, and Washington Gardener Magazine.

The monthly talk timing is 1-2:30 except where noted with a *.

The talks all take place at the HSW auditorium, 801 K Street NW, Washington, DC.

They are FREE and open to the general public.

This series is specifically aimed at the urban, beginner gardener and getting DC gardening.
It is open to anyone and seating is first-come.

March 28
Urban Tree Care and Tree Giveaway Program by Jim Woodworth, Casey Trees

April 18
The Best Vegetables to Grow in DC by Cindy Brown, Green Spring Gardens

May 30*
Landscaping with Natives by Cheval Force Opp, Garden Tours (*10:00-11:30)

June 27
Growing the Perfect Tomato by Elizabeth Olson, Maryland Certified Professional Horticulturist

July 11
Rain Barrels and Water Management by Barry Chenkin, Aquabarrels

August 22
Canning Your Harvest Bounty by Liz Falk, 7th Street Gardens

September 19*
Raising Winter Greens by Brett Grohsgal, Even Star Organic Farm CSA (*2:30-4)

October 3
Building a School Garden by Grace Manubay, DC Schoolyard Greening

November 14
Putting Your Garden to Bed for Winter by Kathy Jentz, Washington Gardener Magazine

December – none

Full listing is also posted here:
http://www.washingt ongardener. com/index_ files/Events. htm

DC Urban Gardeners and Garden Magazine

Mar 17
“Hope and the future for me are not in lawns and cultivated fields,
not in towns and cities, but in the impervious and quaking swamps.”
Henry Thoreau
From the essay “Walking

Mar 13


Hi all -

We are constantly being asked for locations of local community garden plots and are trying to create a comprehensive listing for everyone to use as a resource. We have it started here:

http://www.washingt ongardener. com/index_ files/CommunityG ardens.htm

Thanks to Bea, Mandy, and Judy for the big head start on the DC listings!

We need YOUR help adding any that are not on this listing page. We know there are garden plots at retirement homes, apartment complexes, and on government property that are hidden and only known of by word-of-mouth. We want to hear about them!

Share your community garden plot information with me us emailing me back (off-list) or directly at WGardenermag@ aol.com.

Please pass along to any other local area gardeners you may know.

Sincerely,
Kathy Jentz
Editor/Publisher
Washington Gardener Magazine
826 Philadelphia Ave.
Silver Spring MD 20910
301-588-6894
WGardenermag@ aol.com
www.WashingtonGarde ner.com

DC Urban Gardeners

Mar 5

Feb 20

Jan 29

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